Adjectives and Adverbs

ADJECTIVES

HOT GRAMMAR TIP

Many adverbs end in "ly."

What is an adjective?
An adjective is a modifier, a word that describes a noun or a pronoun.
Example #1

The quick fox jumped over the fence.
Reasoning: The word "quick" is an adjective because it describes the noun "fox."

Example #2

We are tired.
Reasoning: The word "tired" is an adjective because it describes the pronoun "we."


ADVERBS

What is an adverb?
An adverb is also a modifier, but it describes a verb, an adjective, or another adverb. An adverb sometimes answers the question "how?" or "in what way?" or to "what degree?"

HOT GRAMMAR TIP

When do you use an adverb instead of an adjective?
While an adjective describes or modifies ONLY a noun or a pronoun, an adverb ALWAYS describes or modifies ONLY a verb, an adjective, or another adverb.

Example #1

The fox jumped over the fence quickly.
Reasoning: The word "quickly" is an adverb because it describes HOW the fox jumped as opposed to describing the fox itself.

Example #2

John is very short.
Reasoning: This is an example of how an adverb can describe an adjective. The word "short" is an adjective because it describes John, but "very" is an adverb because it modifies the adjective "short." In other words, "very" tells HOW "short" John is.

Example #3

John dresses very successfully for the job.
Reasoning: This is an example of how an adverb can describe another adverb. The word "successfully" is an adverb because it describes the verb "dresses" (HOW John dresses). The word "very" is an adverb that modifies the adverb "successfully."

Now that you have learned about adjectives and adverbs, try the exercises!

Exercise 1 | Exercise 2