Conjunctions

HOT GRAMMAR TIP

A subordinate clause is a dependent clause. It cannot stand by itself since it needs an independent clause to be a complete sentence.
What is a conjunction?
A conjunction is a word or phrase that links two nouns, pronouns, verbs or clauses.
What types of conjunctions are there?
There are four types of conjunctions: subordinate, coordinate, correlative, and adverbial. We will only present subordinate and coordinate conjunctions here.

Subordinate Conjunctions

A subordinate conjunction is a word or phrase that begins a subordinate or dependent clause. Examples of common subordinate conjunctions are the following: since, because, when, if, after, although, until, etc.

Example #1

When I get tired, I don't function as well as I normally do.
Explanation: The subordinate conjunction is "when," and it begins the subordinate clause "when I get tired."

Example #2

Since he left his money at home, we can't buy groceries.
Explanation: The subordinate conjunction is "since," and it begins the subordinate clause "since he left his money at home."

Coordinate Conjunctions

A coordinate conjunction is a word or phrase that connects two nouns, pronouns, verbs, or clauses. There are only 7 coordinate conjunctions: and, but, or, nor, so, for, yet.

Example #1

They went to the theatre, and we went with them.
Explanation: The coordinate conjunction is "and," and it connects the two independent clauses.

Example #2

They wanted to go boating in the lake, but the weather was uncooperative.
Explanation: The coordinate conjunction is "but," and it connects the two independent clauses.

Exercise 1 | Exercise 2