Nouns

What is a noun?
A noun is a person, place, or thing.
What is the difference between a common noun and a proper noun?
A common noun is ANY person, place, or thing, whereas a proper noun is a particular person, place, or thing.
Common Nouns
Example #1 (Common Noun—person and thing)

The man didn't know when the concert started.
The common nouns are "man" and "concert."
Reasoning: A "man" refers to a person; therefore, it is a common noun. A "concert" refers to a thing; therefore it is also a common noun.

Example #2 (Common Noun—place and thing)

The city sponsored the concert.
The common nouns are "city" and "concert."
Reasoning: A "city" refers to a place; therefore, it is a common noun. A "concert" refers to a thing; therefore, it is also a common noun.

Example #3 (Common Noun—things)

The music played all night.
The common nouns are "music" and "night."
Reasoning: "music" and "night" are both things; therefore, they are both common nouns.

Proper Nouns
Example #1 (Proper Noun—person)

Mr. Jones didn't know when the concert played.
The proper noun is "Mr. Jones."
Reasoning: "Mr. Jones" refers to a particular person; therefore, "Mr. Jones" is a proper noun.

Example #2 (Proper Noun—place)

New York City sponsored the concert.
The proper noun is "New York City."
Reasoning: "New York City" refers to a particular place; therefore, it is a proper noun.

Example #3 (Proper Noun—thing)

The group Backstreet Boys played all night.
The proper noun is "Backstreet Boys."
Reasoning: The "Backstreet Boys" refers to a particular thing; therefore, it is a proper noun.

Exercise 1 | Exercise 2